The Dystopian Novel by Three Bestselling Authors You Don’t Have to Buy — Because It’s FREE!

The Novel by Three Bestselling Authors
You Don’t Have to Buy
— Because It’s FREE

HENTY’S FIST 1: GAUNTLET RUN: Birth of a Superhero
by Andre Jute, Dakota Franklin, Andrew McCoy

The Gauntlet Run is the toughest race ever run by man: across America with every man’s hand turned against you from the statue of Liberty to the old US Mint in San Francisco. There the prize awaits you: $10 million and a full and free Presidential Pardon.

The Runner is marked for all to see by an indestructible Fist, keyed to his metabolism. If the Fist is removed without the key from the Mint in San Francisco, he dies. Between the Runner and the key stand the ruthless bounty hunters, the Syndicate’s lethal odds fixers, the sinister Organ Bank chasers, the Humble & Poor Hunt, the US Air Force, and mobs of good citizens, all turned into bloodthirsty savages by the magnificent prize for tearing the Fist from the Runner — and the Presidential license that nothing done to the Runner shall be illegal.

Henty needs two million dollars to send her son Petey to the Artie stericlinic for treatment that will save his life. The care of The Caring Society is exhausted, her chicken farm already carries a second mortgage. Hopeless. But beautiful young Texas widows don’t just give up. There is still the Gauntlet Run. To qualify, you have to be a criminal — so Henty robs a bank…

No woman has ever Run the Gauntlet. No Runner has ever survived the Gauntlet.

FREE on Amazon and Google Play
Kindle and all other formats FREE on Smashwords.
Also FREE on Apple & Kobo & B&N

Bonecruncher: Matt Posner’s pro wrestling novel SQUARED CIRCLE BLUES

Squared Circle BluesSQUARED CIRCLE BLUES:
A Novel of Professional Wrestling

by MATT POSNER

Reviewed by Andrew McCoy

SQUARED CIRCLE BLUES is exactly what it says on the tin, a novel of pro wrestling. Author Matt Posner pulls no punches, paints no glosses, makes no excuses for the milieu, the characters, or their actions. Pro wrestling turns out exactly as expected, only more violent, more dangerous, more crooked and more ruinous of the lives of innocent bystanders.

SQUARED CIRCLE BLUES rings true because it is true to the spirit and the detail of pro wrestling, which isn’t a sport but a business which consumes its children.

The organizers of pro wrestling are, of course, unsympathetic characters. But the surprising thing is how many of the wrestlers, and their families, are simpatico. It helps enormously to build our identification with the good characaters that Mr Posner gives us their viewpoint largely in dialogue, in their own words. He has a fine ear for the vernacular, and it turns these fantastic characters from the bizarre end of the spectrum of human experience into people like our
neighbours, at least if our neighbours were colourful.

By adding a large appendix of sources in which his facts can be checked, Mr Posner reinforces the impression that SQUARED CIRCLE BLUES, if it weren’t such good storytelling, could be a documentary, straightforward journalism told mainly in dialogue.

lanceseriesgraphicFor me, the main takeaway from this surprising, fascinating novel is how smoothly Mr Posner has managed to undermine our prejudicial certainties about people outside our own circle of trust and knowledge.
Andrew McCoy is the author of the Lance Weber series of adventure novels and literary criticism like STIEG LARSSON Man, Myth & Mistress.

Brand #NEW Lance #Weber #adventure from Andrew #McCoy

SMALL WAR, FAR AWAY
by Andrew McCoy

Lance Webber is on trial for his life for the adventures recounted in BLOOD IVORY. Even if he escapes the hangman’s rope, he can’t stay in Africa. But his friend Tanner is already established in South America, so Lance goes ranching. However, Hernandez, the military governor of the State, wants Lance and Tanner’s land, and the Falklands War gives him the pretext to turn Lance and his party, including guests like Jimmy and Boo, into wanted criminals on the run. This explosive scenario is complicated by Jimmy’s girlfriend, the daughter of the French politician who has yes-power over delivery of the Exocets without which Argentina knows she will lose the Falklands war. Hernandez must take Jeanine alive or his military superiors will stand him up in front of a firing squad.

SMALL WAR, FAR AWAY (Lance Weber 4) by Andrew McCoy

To save his wife and child, and his friends and their women, Lance must run and fight like he has never run and fought before, several thousand miles down the spine of Argentina to the only safety a stone’s throw from the Antartic at Punta Arenas on Cape Horn. But first, his back to a bridge he has blown up himself, in front of him a single road guarded by several hundred vengeful Argentinian soldiers, he must break out of the forest on the slopes of the Andes in which he has hidden the party.

SMALL WAR, FAR AWAY is another triumphant proof that no one excels Andrew McCoy in describing men and women in violent motion with their honor and lives as the prizes of failure. It is a tour de force by a writer at the peak of his form.

If you haven’t yet read the Andrew McCoy’s landmark Lance Weber Series, read the reviews below, then check it out.

Andrew McCoy’s books are available from iTunes Smashwords Kobo B&N and all other good vendors. Kindle versions from Smashwords.

Lance Weber Adventures by Andrew McCoy

What the critics said

“Mr McCoy gets on with the job of telling us exactly what it is like in the Heart of Darkness. He has the soldier’s eye for terrain and the soldier’s eye for character. This has the ring of truth.”
John Braine/Sunday Telegraph

“Very rough, exciting, filmic, and redolent of a nostalgie de boue d’Afrique. Full of the rapport and affection for blacks experienced only by the genuine old Africa hand.”
Alastair Phillips/Glasgow Herald

“Like the unblinking eye of a cobra, it is fascinating and hard to look away from, powerful and unique.”
Edwin Corley/Good Books

“I found this work excellent. I recommend it as a book to read on several planes, whether of politics, history or just as thriller — every episode is firmly etched on my memory. It is certainly a most impressive work of fiction.”
“H.P.”/BBC External Service

“Like a steam hammer on full bore.”
Jack Adrian/Literary Review

“Something else again. The author has plenty of first-hand experience of the conditions he describes so vividly.”
Marese Murphy/Irish Times

“Totally convincing fiction.”
Colonel Jonathan Alford, Director, Institute for Strategic Studies/BBC World at One

“The reader is in good hands.”
Kirkus Reviews

“Even in an entertaining thriller he makes us see ourselves anew.”
La Prensa

“Graphic adult Boys Own Adventure.”
The Irish Press

“Well written by somebody who has lived the life: a cracking read.”
Grant MacNeill/Amazon

CAIN’S COURAGE Classic Adventure by Andrew McCoy for 99¢

Who else gives you reviews and thrills like these
in a proven bestseller for only 99¢?

What the critics said:

“Mr McCoy gets on with the job of telling us exactly what it is like in the Heart of Darkness. He has the soldier’s eye for terrain and the soldier’s eye for character. This has the ring of truth.”
John Braine/Sunday Telegraph

“Very rough, exciting, filmic, and redolent of a nostalgie de boue d’Afrique. Full of the rapport and affection for blacks experienced only by the genuine old Africa hand.”
Alastair Phillips/Glasgow Herald

“Like the unblinking eye of a cobra, it is fascinating and hard to look away from, powerful and unique.”
Edwin Corley/Good Books 

“I found this work excellent. I recommend it as a book to read on several planes, whether of politics, history or just as thriller — every episode is firmly etched on my memory. It is certainly a most impressive work of fiction.”
“H.P.”/BBC External Service 

“Like a steam hammer on full bore.”
Jack Adrian/Literary Review

“Something else again. The author has plenty of first-hand experience of the conditions he describes so vividly.”
Marese Murphy/Irish Times 

“Totally convincing fiction.”
Colonel Jonathan Alford, Director, Institute for Strategic Studies/BBC World at One 

“The reader is in good hands.”
Kirkus Reviews 

“Even in an entertaining thriller he makes us see ourselves anew.”
La Prensa 

“Graphic adult Boys Own Adventure.”
The Irish Press

“Well written by somebody who has lived the life: a cracking read.”
Grant MacNeill

More about this classic thriller at STOP THE TERRORISTS! DEAD.

Who else gives you reviews and thrills like these in a proven bestseller for only 99¢?
Get a sample/buy: iTunes Smashwords Kobo B&N

Hey this is non-stop action for sure! … and quoting Jacques Ellul! Too much! — JimK on GAUNTLET RUN, a free superhero novel

Hey this is non-stop action for sure! But even better – I was just driving north on US-206 past I-78 just about a week ago! Netcong!

… and quoting Jacques Ellul! Too much!

— JimK

GAUNTLET RUN (Henty's Fist 1: Birth of a Superhero) by Andre Jute, Dakota Franklin and Andrew McCoyFREE from iTunes Smashwords Kobo B&N

This is what Jim is referring to:

A copperchopper was diving at them.

Henty twitched the wheel but the pistol ground into her ear and she twitched it back, sending more Troubles flying out of the back of the trailer. The Troubles were throwing boxes of food onto the road and Henty could see other Troubles dashing onto the road to fetch the food and then dash back again. This was no isolated skirmish. She was in the middle of a full-scale battle which would start as soon as the opposing army of National Guardsmen and State Troopers finished lining up.

The copperchopper fired its pair of rockets. Henty saw the puffs of smoke as they left the chopper. They fell lazily to only ten feet above the ground, then aimed themselves at the truck and accelerated blisteringly towards it.

Henty panicked and stood up on the brake. The tractor came almost to a dead halt, the trailer didn’t. It swung around and jack-knifed the horse the other way. The two rockets hit the trailer simultaneously, ringing the cab and deafening Henty.

Henty used the confusion to grab the Trouble Sheila’s gun out of her ear, out of the Sheila’s hand, and to throw it out of the window. The Sheila scrambled for the zipgun the suicidal doped-up driver had left in the cab but the Fist was too quick for her and that went out of the window too.

“What you gonna do without a gun?” the Sheila wanted to know. “Man, you crazy.” With that, she opened the door and jumped.

In the big mirror, Henty saw the Sheila roll, come upright for a moment, then disappear over the side of the road like she never existed.

There was a turnoff and Henty took it, seeing in the mirror the remains of the trailer being shredded and disintegrated against the blacktop.

She punched the large query on the route finder. It told her, YOU’RE ON US-206 HEADING NORTH FOR NETCONG. Then it flashed and beeped her: US-206 NOGO WARZONE NOGO, complete with skull and crossbones.

“Everywhere’s no-go,” said Henty, and put her foot down.

 — from GAUNTLET RUN by André Jute, Dakota Franklin & Andrew McCoy
— a FREE novel in any format you want
— also from iTunes Smashwords Kobo B&N

“I give this book five stars. It is highly recommended for everyone with a strong stomach for violence.” — Matt Posner

mccoy_blood_ivory_cover_800pxh

Contemporary review of
BLOOD IVORY by Andrew McCoy
by the novelist
Matt Posner
***** (5 stars out of 5)

This book was originally published in the 1970s; I read the new edition by Cool Main Press, which is both re-issuing Andrew McCoy’s work and commissioning new novels from him. This text was provided to me by the publisher at my request since I was interviewing the gentleman for my website.

Blood Ivory is a direct sequel to African Revenge, to which I also gave five stars. Both feature as hero Lance Weber, who is an apprentice adventurer in the first novel and a veteran adventurer here, travelling on the road in a caravan of trucks with a mixture of sub-Saharan Africans as employees and partners. Both are unflinching in their depiction of race relations and racial conflict. Blood Ivory adds some new elements: boats, helicopters, and Chinese participants in the conflicts.

lance_weber_series_cover_2500

The range of this story is expanded to include England and many places in Asia, including Singapore and Hong Kong. More parts of Africa are shown; I was surprised by the small scale, since the truck convoy seems to cross countries in fewer hours than it would take to cross states that I drive through in the United States. I know Andrew McCoy has it right, however. No thriller writer knows Africa better than Andrew McCoy.

The novel posits an alternate-reality version of the 1970s world in which wild elephants are near extinction, and with their extermination, the price of their ivory will be dramatically magnified. The result, as one might expect after reading African Revenge, is brutal slaughter of men as well as animals.

Blood Ivory is a very gripping novel with strong characterization and terrific plot. It confirms me in my belief that I will enjoy anything Andrew McCoy writes, even when I am horrified by the cruelty and gore and even when I find the characters’ attitudes alien to my own. This is a different type of thriller than those written in this century, because of its setting, because of the treatment of race (and violence toward women), because of the characters’ necessary reliance upon 1970s technology (no mobile phones or computers).

I give this book five stars. It is highly recommended for everyone with a strong stomach for violence.

I hope I will soon see a reissue of McCoy’s controversial novel Atrocity Week. Really longing for a look at that one.

Read more international reviews from leading papers around the world.

Get a sample or buy it at
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“….exactly what it is like in the Heart of Darkness” — John Braine/Sunday Telegraph

CoolMain Press Proudly Announces
Back by Popular Demand
BLOOD IVORY
Second in Andrew McCoy’s
LANCE WEBER SERIES
About the Quintessential Hard Man of Africa

mccoy_blood_ivory_cover_800pxh
BLOOD IVORY
by Andrew McCoy

The equation is simple: on the day the last elephant in the world is shot, ivory will be more valuable than gold. Two men — one a merchant prince, the other a big-game hunter — are preparing for that day by acculumating vast hoards of the irreplaceable tusk. It is the hunter who makes the first mistake, and pays the price.

His widow engages Lance Weber on the lethal brief of reclaiming her inheritance from the very heart of war-torn Africa. Lance is on the run from the ghost of Bruun, a man believed by every authority to be dead, who is still killing Lance’s employees, friends, parents, drawing concentric circles of terror ever tighter around Lance himself. Lance wants no ivory but he is driven by the need to avenge the many innocent dead and to expunge the evil of Bruun from the face of the earth. Bruun has shown that he too lusts for the ivory, so Lance sets himself, the ivory — and the beautiful widow — as bait for the mad predator. Their violent duel carves a scar across the face of the globe, from Sydney to Kent to Macao, from the harsh red grit of Africa to the suppurating green lushness of the Opium Triangle.

— dust-jacket blurb by John Blackwell, from the original hardcover edition

It did not occur to Mpengi that men would die in Macao, the China Seas, Brussels, Tokyo, the Burmese jungles, Africa and the Kent countryside because the bellies of his children were empty. He did not know of these places.

What Mpengi did that would have such disastrous effects around the world, what he did to relieve the gnawing mouse in the bellies of his children, was simplicity itself. He wenr to the camp of the Englishman with the red face and the luxuriant white moustache and told him where to find the last six elephants in the world.

— from BLOOD IVORY by Andrew McCoy

What the critics said:

“Mr McCoy gets on with the job of telling us exactly what it is like in the Heart of Darkness. He has the soldier’s eye for terrain and the soldier’s eye for character. This has the ring of truth.”
John Braine/Sunday Telegraph

“Very rough, exciting, filmic, and redolent of a nostalgie de boue d’Afrique. Full of the rapport and affection for blacks experienced only by the genuine old Africa hand.”
Alastair Phillips/Glasgow Herald

“Like the unblinking eye of a cobra, it is fascinating and hard to look away from, powerful and unique.”
Edwin Corley/Good Books

“I found this work excellent. I recommend it as a book to read on several planes, whether of politics, history or just as thriller — every episode is firmly etched on my memory. It is certainly a most impressive work of fiction.”
“H.P.”/BBC External Service

“Like a steam hammer on full bore.”
Jack Adrian/Literary Review

“Something else again. The author has plenty of first-hand experience of the conditions he describes so vividly.”
Marese Murphy/Irish Times

“Totally convincing fiction.”
Colonel Jonathan Alford, Director, Institute for Strategic Studies/BBC World at One

“The reader is in good hands.”
Kirkus Reviews

“Even in an entertaining thriller he makes us see ourselves anew.”
La Prensa

“Graphic adult Boys Own Adventure.”
The Irish Press

“Well written by somebody who has lived the life: a cracking read.”
Grant MacNeill/Amazon

Buy it or get a sample at:
iTunes Smashwords Kobo B&N

Read an e-book week #ebookweek: FREE Books and Deep Discounts from CoolMain Press

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AFRICAN REVENGE by ANDREW MCCOY: Internationally acclaimed thriller hits ebooks for first time, starts series


First time in ebook! AFRICAN REVENGE is the first of the LANCE WEBER SERIES

AFRICAN REVENGE by Andrew McCoy


Lance Weber has a brilliant future in international rugby but he makes the dangerous mistake of running up a huge gambling debt. When the debt is called, and reinforced by the chilling threat of casual mutilation, Lance is in trouble. His only way out is to make a lot of money, and to make it fast.  

In desperation, Lance turns to his brother Ewart, an ex-mercenary with a reputation for ferocious efficiency. With his colleague, Colonel Roux, Ewart has acquired a concession to kill crocodiles along the Congo border and to market the skins. Lance, who harbors romantic notions of a hunting party on safari, agrees to go along. He is in for a series of shocks.  

To his horror, Lance finds himself embroiled in a ruthless operation that traverses the face of Africa like a mobile small-scale war. Throughout the brutal journey, Lance has to learn a series of new and frightening skills — or die. As the party fights to blast a fortune out of Africa, the continent exacts its own bitter revenge.  

Andrew McCoy’s two earlier novels, ATROCITY WEEK and THE INSURRECTIONIST, roused violent controversy. With a talent for narrative that moves at a scorching pace, McCoy matches his unique authority — expertise won from experience — to a profound appreciation of the beauty and cruelty of Africa itself. The blend is electrifying.  

— John Blackwell 


 


The LANCE WEBER SERIES  consist of the three Lance Weber novels Secker & Warburg published in hardcover to international acclaim, plus two brand-new novels CoolMain Press commissioned from me. All five will be published in chronological order.

The hard life of an editor 1: From Lisa Penington’s diary

Lisa Penington will be remembered by readers of Kissing the Blarney for her piece on the open-air Puccini last year. Lisa is one of the mainstays of the Editorial Menagerie, where she edits books by Dakota Franklin, Andrew McCoy and Andre Jute for CoolMain Press. It’s a hard life, as these entries from Lisa’s diary demonstrate.

lisa_nice_124th July 2013.   Day one

On my way to Nice after a two day trip back to England for a meeting. Using my 90 minutes free wifi at Heathrow airport I find that my son and his family from the US are on their way and have taken off for Nice after a short stop over in Dublin.  My younger daughter, her husband and three children are winging their way from Gatwick.  They will all get there before me!

It’s hot when I arrive at 5.30pm but they have all repaired to my older daughter’s house where I join them.  The children are already in the pool.  We have a pleasant long supper on the terrace and walk down past fields of lavender to my house where all nine of us are packed into the four bedrooms.

This will be the first time all seven grandchildren will have been together in one place and as two are now on the threshold of university it may well be the last.  We plan to get them all together for a photo-call in the next few days!

lisa_nice_225th July.  Day two

The three youngest children woke bright and early and insisted to walking to the bakery with me to buy pains au chocolat, baguettes etc.  the ‘Americans’ slept longer because of the time change.  We split up and daughter number two took the small children to the beach in Antibes and daughter number one and the rest of us went food shopping the back for a lovely salad Niçoise then to the smart Mall on the seafront near Nice called Cap 3000  where quite a bit of window shopping went on. Stopped for lovely Italian ice creams them who should we meet in the whole of the Côte d’Azur but the younger branch of the family, shopping in the glamorous Lafayette supermarket.  Home to La Gaude for family supper  with all thirteen of us.

The hard life of an editor 2:  Wolves on the Cote d’Azur

Copyright © 2013 Lisa Penington

GAUNTLET RUN: Birth of a Superhero — a little light fantasy bestseller Dakota and Andrew and I knocked up

GAUNTLET RUN (Henty's Fist 1: Birth of a Superhero) by Andre Jute, Dakota Franklin and Andrew McCoyAMAZON
#25 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Literature & Fiction > Fantasy > Superhero

KOBO
#491 in Sci Fi & Fantasy > Science Fiction
#463 in Mystery & Suspense > Suspense
#128 in Sci Fi & Fantasy > Science Fiction > Adventure Sci Fi

HENTY’S FIST 1: GAUNTLET RUN: Birth of a Superhero
by Andre Jute, Dakota Franklin, Andrew McCoy

The Gauntlet Run is the toughest race ever run by man: across America with every man’s hand turned against you from the statue of Liberty to the old US Mint in San Francisco. There the prize awaits you: $10 million and a full and free Presidential Pardon.

The Runner is marked for all to see by an indestructible Fist, keyed to his metabolism. If the Fist is removed without the key from the Mint in San Francisco, he dies. Between the Runner and the key stand the ruthless bounty hunters, the Syndicate’s lethal odds fixers, the sinister Organ Bank chasers, the Humble & Poor Hunt, the US Air Force, and mobs of good citizens, all turned into bloodthirsty savages by the magnificent prize for tearing the Fist from the Runner — and the Presidential license that nothing done to the Runner shall be illegal.

Henty needs two million dollars to send her son Petey to the Artie stericlinic for treatment that will save his life. The care of The Caring Society is exhausted, her chicken farm already carries a second mortgage. Hopeless. But beautiful young Texas widows don’t just give up. There is still the Gauntlet Run. To qualify, you have to be a criminal — so Henty robs a bank…

No woman has ever Run the Gauntlet. No Runner has ever survived the Gauntlet.

You have to pay 99c at Amazon and B&N

But you can get it FREE on Apple & Kobo

FREE thriller by three bestselling, award-winning authors collaborating: GAUNTLET RUN: birth of a superhero

THE FREE BOOK



The Gauntlet Run is the toughest race ever run by man: across America with every man’s hand turned against you from the statue of Liberty to the old US Mint in San Francisco. There the prize awaits you: $10 million and a full and free Presidential Pardon.

No woman has ever Run the Gauntlet. No Runner has ever survived the Gauntlet.

GAUNTLET RUN is a 60 thousand word serial novel in 76 parts by bestselling, prizewinning authors Andre Jute, Dakota Franklin and Andrew McCoy — FREE on Wattpad!

THE AUTHORS


 
Dakota Franklin is the author of the RUTHLESS TO WIN series. Her latest is NASCAR FIRST. The series RUTHLESS TO WIN is under offer for a television series and set of films. Most recentinterview with Dakota.

 
Andre Jute is the author of iDITAROD and the COLD WAR, HOT PASSIONS series just starting up with VANGUARD ELITE. Most recent article by Andre, “Fear is the Best Diet”.

 
Andrew McCoy is the author of THE MEYERSCO HELIX and co-author (with Andre) of STIEG LARSSON Man, Myth & Mistress

Can actress Rooney Mara teach Morality to the Limousine Left? André Jute investigates the volte face on Larsson.

It had to happen sometime. In all the sickening sycophancy surrounding the Millennium Trilogy of Stieg Larsson, someone with a pop profile sooner or later had to mention that the King was swaggering down the street stark naked — and in this case with a definite hard-on for every woman in sight.

It just happened to be an actress, Rooney Mara, who blew the whistle on Larsson. She played Lisbeth Salander in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, made from the eponymous book by Larsson. For daring to suggest that the iconic character is not a feminist, she was publicly taken to task by Eva Gabrielsson, common-law widow of Larsson, self-appointed keeper of his flame. “Does she not know what film she has been in?” asked Gabrielsson patronisingly, as if being in the film signifies full agreement with Gabrielsson’s interpretation of Larsson. “Has she read the book?” Gabrielsson castigated her for her impertinence, as if an actress couldn’t possibly understand. “Has she not had any coaching?” Gabrielsson delivered the killer blow, as if an actress couldn’t possibly think for herself.

Some feminist Gabrielsson turns out to be, demonstrating in three short sentences that she thinks women are in certain professions because they’re stupid! But it’s worse than that. There’s a sense here that insiders, like Gabrielsson, like the filmmakers, like Mara’s handlers, know that Larsson and his characters Blomkvist and Salander as feminists are a fraud, but that it is in everyone’s interest to keep quiet about it, to toe the party line, to lie “for the cause”, to commit the “few necessary murders”. The reverberating metaphors are deliberately chosen because, had he not been a loud leftist, Larsson’s boosters would never in a million years have been allowed to get away with the scam that has been perpetrated on the public by Gabrielsson, Larsson’s editors, publishers and a wide swathe of “journalists” who betrayed their profession by not checking a single fact.

Eva Gabrielsson
(Photo courtesy The Age, Australia)

There’s nothing new in this. In STIEG LARSSON Man, Myth & Mistress, published in December 2010, more than a year ago, Andrew McCoy and I analysed the reasons Stieg Larsson the writer, and his creations Blomkvist and Salander, are not feminists. The reasons are really pretty obvious and all come down to two points: they don’t believe in the same things as feminists and they don’t behave like feminists. In STIEG LARSSON Man, Myth & Mistress Andrew and I predicted that eventually the barrage of lies about Larsson from his publishers and lover would sicken the more sensible journalists. We also thought the real feminists, who know Larsson isn’t a feminist but a middle-aged fantasist, but have been keeping quiet “for the good of the cause”, would be in the vanguard of the turning on Larsson that was due sooner or later.

Never in our fondest imaginings did we for even a minute hope that an actress would lead the charge— sorry, I mean the sorrowful change of heart.

The people who lied to us about Larsson (for instance about his Ethiopian and Grenadan experiences which are clearly inventions that they should have questioned) won’t apologise. It is what makes them despicable as publishers. (Yeah, I know, you think I’ve just cut off a part of my future as a writer; forget it, if I have something in my hand that they want, they’ll kiss my ass for it as if I never called them “despicable”, as if they never tried to intimidate me with lawyers, as if I never laughed in their faces; they’re the creatures of accountants, who have numbers where people have feelings.) The hack journalists who unblushingly wrote up all their lies as the gospel won’t even know they’ve done something wrong.

When a huge, multifarious lie has been perpetrated on this scale — Larsson’s three novels have now sold well over 60 million copies, so the lies have been told to at least that many people — the reckoning always in its beginning stutter and stumble before it gains irresistible momentum. People don’t like to admit they were wrong. Journalists in particular believe they’re infallible, and if they write for the self-elected leftwing papers, they’re in addition charged with being a vanguard elite for the masses. If their leftwing paper is a broadsheet, then they are like the Lamb, washed in the blood Eternal Truth. Having to say, “Sorry, I made a mistake,” really hurts those with such a mentality.

Here’s the stuttering beginnings of the truth in The Observer, a once-great paper which now serves the wishy-washy Left of Centre British middle classes, where Manners count for more than Truth. These are people, readers and journalists alike, who are well aware that real leftists, of the nature of Lenin and Trotsky, and Pol Pot and Stieg Larsson and Eva Gabrielsson, if they ever came to power, would shoot them first as bourgeois frauds. I’m not joking: in Sweden, Larsson and Gabrielsson are openly Trotskyists, and Larsson was for a long time the editor of the Trotskyite journal. Nick Cohen’s article was reprinted in The Guardian, a once-great paper (Alistair Cooke used to work for it before he went to the BBC and to America) which now serves the Bicycle Left, which fondly believes it has something in common, well at least in spirit, with Arthur Scargill. Guardian readers live in a dreamland of normative cases; anyone with politically correct credentials can tell them the most outrageous lies and be applauded for it. That it happened in the case of Stieg Larsson is of interest to us, but to the average Guardian reader it is pretty routine that the editorial staff of his newspaper should lie to him; he prefers it. In STIEG LARSSON Man, Myth & Mistress Andrew and I demonstrate some of the lies Guardian readers were told about Larsson, and we aren’t aware of a single complaint from a subscriber.

eBook $2.99

Of course, Cohen’s article is hidden among the think-pieces, whereas the lies were told in big feature spreads. But you can’t expect editors who sit at the right hand of God to be honest even when they’re admitting a lie. Cohen starts off by implying that they were misled about Larsson and Gabrielsson because those two are on the European Far Left, that is, rather than on the cuddly ineffectual Left, which in Britain these days is in practice resigned to perpetual Thatcherism, since Tony Blair made “New Labour” electable by simply stealing Mrs Thatcher’s policies. It’s a crap argument, and Cohen will go on to admit he knew Larsson was of the Far Left.

Now, actually, the Far Left has a record on feminism that accords precisely with that of the Vatican and any mullah who wants to punish adultery by public beheading and an immodest glance by public whipping. Anyone who belongs to the far left by definition cannot be a feminist. Period.

As Andrew and I point out, being revolted by violence to women is a decent impulse but by itself it makes no one a feminist. Yet Gabrielsson makes this the single test of a feminist. Why? She isn’t stupid. It is because Larsson cannot pass any of the other tests, as is easily demonstrated from his own writings and behaviour, including to Gabrielsson, whom he left unprovided for after 32 years with a crude lie that his publishers were seeing to a will that leaves everything to her.

The Far Left solves this problem by being outraged at violence practised on white women but determinedly leaving patriarchal violence practised on brown and black women by Islamic and other societies where women are property as a matter entirely for the indigenes. That this is a racist solution they plaster over by loudly accusing anyone who disagrees of being — a racist! Cohen, no fool, calls this “relativist politics”, a superbly accurate phrase, but in the mouths of the Soft Left another lie, with overtones of Einsteinian inevitability. Bullshit. It’s moral relativism, and it is, like all morality, elective, practiced by choice.

The people who lied to us about Larsson’s feminism cannot even claim ignorance. Larsson wrote a book about the “honour” killings in Sweden. He laid out his attitudes and beliefs in hard, permanent print. Cohen admits he knew about this book, and that he ignored what was likely to be in it, and instead assumed that Larsson betrayed the Far Left to become a feminist. “The far left’s record [of] alliances with radical Islam make it, at best, a misogynist force and, at worst, an active agent of oppression. Larsson appeared to be the exception. I wrote in the Observer about how impressed I was when I discovered that while completing his thrillers, Larsson found the time to dash off a polemic about honour killings in Sweden. Here, after all these years, was a leftist who preferred to drag himself out of the swamp of relativist politics rather than compromise his principles.” Notice that Cohen doesn’t tell us he read Larsson’s “polemic” about the “honour” killings. He just assumed what suited the tone of beatification of Larsson that his paper, and all papers of similar political persuasion, were indulging in at the time.

Cohen, putting the best face on a monstrous lie perpetrated on the public, tells us the motivation for ignoring knowledge in favour of wishful thinking, in short for lying knowingly. “There is something truly thrilling in the notion that the bestselling thrillers of the past decade were written by that modern rarity — a leftwing, male feminist.” Now he is forced to agree with an actress (God, what a comedown for an intellectual with a spot on the Observer!): “Except that Larsson wasn’t a feminist.” Both motive and conclusion were delineated by Andrew and me fifteen months ago in STIEG LARSSON Man, Myth & Mistress.

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Then Rooney Mara, uncoached, her own woman forming her own opinions, blew the whistle on this huge elitist conspiracy. Now Cohen blames the delay in the truth appearing on his “friend” Johan Lundberg, the editor of the Swedish journal Axess, who “has done what I should have done and read Larsson’s obscure book on honour killings. He waited for the release of the film to give us his findings.” It won’t wash, Nick. You knew what was in that Larsson’s book on the “honour” killings to a likelihood of 99%, you chose to pretend otherwise, and you’ve admitted it. And since you, in London, knew of Larsson’s book on the “honour” killings earlier, “obscure” is another lie.

Cohen ends sniffily with a grudgingly ungracious admission that Rooney Mara has it right: “I do not go to actors for political advice. But when Rooney Mara said that she did not think that Larsson’s Salander was a feminist, she was not the empty-headed celebrity she seemed.”

That’s also Cohen’s admission that all those journalists, who look down on mere actresses (“empty-headed celebrity”), lied and lied and lied about Larsson.

The key word in Nick Cohen’s article is “relativist”, what I expanded above as “lies for the good of the cause”, what someone else (was it Bertrand Russell?) called “a few necessary murders”. Moral relativism perfectly explains how the pretense of feminism, the left-wing record, justifies overlooking the salivating violence in the books, the poor writing, the lies of Larsson and all his boosters, the hypocrisy of almost the entire newspaper and publishing trades, of the feminists (of whom only the most brainless could have believed Larsson was truly a feminist) and of the left-wingers with a specific interest in areas Larsson claimed to have experience in (notably East Africa and Grenada) but clearly had none. These lists grow almost as long as the ones in Larsson’s books!

• Read Nick Cohen’s volte face on Larsson. If you ever catch me out in that large a lie, I hope my mea culpa will be as admirably slippery as Cohen’s!

André Jute is the author, with Andrew McCoy, of the first and only book-length literary criticism of STIEG LARSSON Man, Myth & Mistress.

“All I ask is one chance” — Andrew McCoy, novelist

Andrew McCoy posted these methods and surprising conclusion to a thread on LibraryThing discussing how readers choose books.

Fiction has to fall into a genre I read, thrillers or novels of suspense, or be immensely well written or “novel”. Or be connected to a subject I am interested in, Africa say. Cover and blurb are important, as everyone else says. I love sampling in either print in the bookstore or on the Kindle. I always dip into a novel to read a couple of paragraphs or a page to see if the writer can write. Thick wads of pages without dialogue cause me to put the book down and pick up something else (suck on that, Nabokov!).

Non-fiction I choose by subject, mainly history, biography, biology and zoology. Recently a subject chose me, when special knowledge caused me to be invited to contribute a book of literary criticism (Stieg Larsson Man, Myth Mistress), something I thought I’d never do.

I’m surprised and pleased that over forty readers are asking for a copy of The Meyersco Helix in the current Member Giveaways [on LibraryThing]. I doubt too many of them remember the book or me from when it was first published in 1988. Frankly, as a writer, I tend to believe that my readers are people like me, likely to choose books by authors new to them the same way I do, by cover and blurb and sample. It’s a special privilege to write only books I would want to read, nothing tailored for any “market”.

On rereading this, I see I left out the most compelling reason to buy and read a book: that the author has thrilled or entertained or informed me before. I’ll always pick up a new book by an author I’ve read before. Maybe, because of that, as writer my motto should be: All I ask is one chance.

Critic’s Progress

Readers invest quite a bit of money and plenty of spare time on the sayso of critics of the arts, and most of all on the sayso of critics of books. Yet the same readers rarely catch even a glimpse of the critic at work.

Alina Holgate, apparently on impulse (I certainly didn’t suggest anything so dangerous! — I didn’t even know her), decided to open up the process by showing her mental deliberations in reviewing my THE LARSON SCANDAL the unauthorized guerilla critique of Stieg Larsson on Amazon’s Kindle Discussion Forum.

Alina is a consultant psychologist of stress management who works out of Melbourne with emergency workers and victims of natural disasters; I too am a psychologist, though by training of abnormal psychology and by practice of mass psychology, so I was intensely interested in how a person who is by training sensitized to character, the main preoccupation of the novelist, would see my critique of Larsson.

Here, stripped of the interference of the sourpusses and dickswingers and special pleaders who infest those fora, is Alina Holgate’s mental process, in her own words, as she wends her way through the book towards her review. The review itself is the last entry.

The Critic at Work

Dec. 21, 2010 3:32 AM PST

Just read the Foreword to THE LARSSON SCANDAL.

Bit of background on me. I’ve read all of the Stieg Larsson books because a friend who’d bought the paperbacks lent them to me. I rarely read fiction but I read these because my friend was so enthusiastic about them. I loved the first one. I stayed up way too late reading it. I loved how dense and intelligent the plot was and I loved that it did not follow a standard Hollywood 3 act structure and I loved that the plot twists came as genuine surprises. I enjoyed the 2 following books but they probably didn’t have the same impact of surprise that the first one had. I think it’s terribly unfortunate that Mr. Larsson died before he could write more.

My impressions following reading the foreword (written by Andre Jute) of THE LARSSON SCANDAL:
• this guy can write, he’s engaging and honest and intelligent and bemusing
• I want to read more
• Now I’ve got to check out what else this guy has written because I want to read more written by him.

So, first impressions are – I want to keep reading, and, as far as I’m concerned, that is the best recommendation you can give a book.

I’m going to read more and I’ll update as I do.

***
Dec. 21, 2010 4:09 AM PST

First chapter finished. This chapter would be of especial interest to any novice writer interested in how the publishing game has traditionally worked and the impact of the internet on publishing . Names are named and quoted. The writing has an excellent pace and I’ll definitely be checking out anything more Andre Jute has written. I think he is both appropriately cynical and appropriately respectful to the best and worst of the publishing industry.

Off to bed and will continue updating as I read. I’m looking forward to reading more.

***
Dec. 21, 2010 5:05 PM PST

Continuing to read “THE LARSON SCANDAL: Unauthorized Guerilla Critique of Stieg Larsson”. It’s a very entertaining read and the author certainly has a nice turn of phrase (“Sloane Square wet dream”) and I’ve had quite a few chuckles along the way. He certainly knows how to put the skewer into pretentiousness of all kinds.

The author is so far doing an effective job of demolishing the iconography and myth making surrounding Larsson as an individual, and his criticisms appear to be well researched and well-founded and very entertaining to read as he takes swipes at the media and publishers and certain individuals. I’m wondering though what the point of all this is. No doubt I will find out as I continue to read.

***
Posted on Dec. 21, 2010 5:12 PM PST

Good grief, I learned a new and very handy word – “irredentist”:

One who advocates the recovery of territory culturally or historically related to one’s nation but now subject to a foreign government.

***
Posted on Dec. 22, 2010 3:36 AM PST

OK, now I get the point. The author(s) declared most important chapter is “Is there a single feminist in a house of 50 m people?” This chapter is a j’accuse of, well, pretty much everybody associated with the publishing, distribution, reviewing and consumption of Larsson’s books, which seeks to kick out the foundations of the claim that Larsson’s trilogy is feminist.

I identify myself as a feminist and I found this a most interesting (and amusing) chapter. I’ve always been perplexed at the notion that Larsson is any kind of feminist. In point form:

• he depicts female characters who are intelligent, self-determined and in charge of their sexuality. Does this make his books feminist? Perhaps, but surely there are many other books that do this.

• he abhors systematic violence against women. As the author(s) rightly point out this simply makes him a decent human being, not a feminist.

• his depiction of violence against women comes across as prurient to me, he describes what happens (e.g. he takes an observer’s perspective), he does not describe this horror from the perspective of the victim, the victims (like so many victims of serial killers) are not humanised, they are simply depicted as sad and vulnerable women.

• the perpetrators of violence against women in Larsson’s books are depicted as cartoonish villains of the military-industrial complex who are simply motivated by unmitigated evil. Yes, we know they are “baddies” and that is very satisfying to the reader but it is not a particularly sophisticated depiction of the small and large rationalisations that permit men like this to continue perpetrating violence against women.

• he provides no solution to the problem of violence against women beyond the possibility that we should all turn into vigilantes who personally arrange the tattooing and murder of individual perps. Again, satisfying to the reader to see Salander take revenge – but hardly feminist, more like standard issue good guys vs. bad guys stuff.

• as the writer(s) point out, one of the most irritating things about the character of Kalle is his incredible passivity. He merely blunders through the world having his bones jumped by every single female he encounters. You hardly need to be a feminist scholar to ask yourself “Really? Every single woman he meets wants to do him? And they jump his bones? And he doesn’t have to do anything other than be his violence-against-women-abhorring self?” Yeah, if I were male I’d be wanting to sign up for that alternate reality. And I think that’s where Larsson truly shows himself as a middle-aged male fantasist. Larsson has been careful to show that Kalle is a mere passive recipient of women’s initiated sexual desires but Larsson essentially panders to the fantasy of “I wish I could boff every woman I meet with no complications”. The idea that if feminism reigned women would demand sexual satisfaction from men in the street is, er, an adolescent fantasy I’m afraid.

I agree with the author(s) that Larsson is no feminist and that the promotion of his books as some sort of feminism is a crock and that this debate will only be had in forums like this because no-one else gives a FF (that is, flying f-word).

I have read the rest of the book but I want to settle on it and re-read the last few chapters before doing a more formal review. I can assure you that it’s a very enjoyable read.

***
Dec. 23, 2010 3:59 AM PST

Just published a review of the book for anyone interested. Copy text below:

Fasten your seatbelts, we’re in for a bumpy ride

I’ll declare my interests. I received a free review copy of this book from the author Jute through the kindle Discussions boards. Would I shell out 2.99 of hard-earned to read this? Yes, I would.

This book will certainly be of interest to anyone perplexed by the hoopla over the Millenium Trilogy.

Good things about this book:

• it is written in an extremely entertaining and engaging manner (to my mind) and provides much amusement and quite a few chuckles as the author(s) attack *everyone* associated with the Larsson legend.

• it is thought provoking to the degree that I have reread some chapters just to make sure that I have extracted every bit of juice from them.

• its central attack is upon the notion that Larsson should be considered some sort of feminist warrior. The demolition job done on this notion is particularly effective.

• it also evaluates Larsson’s books as a contribution to literature and is also particularly effective and amusing in this critique.

• there were 3 words in the text that I had to look up to discover their meaning (e.g. irredentist). This may sound like pretentious tosh but it happens so rarely that I have to look up a word an author has used appropriately that I am agog in admiration. I like obscure words.

Some things people may not like about this book:

• the author(s) are by no means lacking in the confidence of their convictions. Opinions are very strongly expressed here. Some readers may find the writing to be nasty and arrogant. I believe that the author(s) show sufficient consideration of the point-of-view of the individuals they discuss but there is no denying that the attitude of the author(s) is essentially cynical.

• the book tries to cover so many issues that it can be a bit unstructured and lacking in flow. The book variously: attacks Larsson’s credentials as a feminist; critiques the Millenium trilogy as literature; comments on the publication and review process of Larsson in particular and books in general; comments on the extraordinary personal conflicts between heirs since Larsson’s death. This is a lot to chew on. The pastiche nature of the book is also probably not helped by the fact that there were 2 authors, even though Jute’s “voice” appears to be dominant.

In summary I recommend this book as worth reading. It is well-written and thought provoking and will probably be particularly informative to people who are not familiar with how the world of publishing works. Although this book could be “better”, e.g. some issues could be covered in greater depth rather than jumping from one issue to another, I found it to be extremely diverting reading. I certainly think it is worth buying but I can understand that there are probably a lot of readers who wouldn’t quite get it.

***
More reviews of THE LARSON SCANDAL on Amazon.

Pride & Recruitment

I’m proud of being the editor of Andrew McCoy’s THE MEYERSCO HELIX, and series editor of Dakota Franklin’s fortchcoming series, RUTHLESS TO WIN, which will surely be the most exciting indie launch of 2011.

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If you want to help with the editorial task of making the novels in RUTHLESS TO WIN ready for publication drop me a note at andrejute at coolmainpress with the commercial extension.

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You don’t need any special education. The successful  beta readers on my earlier projects are constant readers who are irritated by misspellings and errors of grammar. You need a certain amount of time, and the patience, and a sense of humor to laugh when things go wrong.

Here’s the address again if you want to join this significant project: andrejute at coolmainpress with the commercial extension.

Eva Gabrielsson starts her Church of St Stieg Larsson of the Millennium Trini— er, Trilogy with a goat sacrifice

Stieg Larsson died before publication of his Millennium Trilogy and the monster success of the three thrillers in it: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played with Fire, and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets’ Nest. Since then the trilogy has sold over 50 million copies and thrown off a legacy of ten of millions of dollars. By a quirk of Swedish law, all this money, and control of the literary estate, went to Larsson’s father and brother, rather than to Larsson’s common-law wife of 32 years, Eva Gabrielsson. Gabrielsson has been fighting a war in the media on the Larsson heirs for control of the literary estate, described in THE LARSON SCANDAL by André Jute and Andrew McCoy. Now Gabrielsson has written her own book, already available in Swedish and French as Millénium, Stieg & moi and it is hot stuff! Now we can check the forecasts of her behaviour made in THE LARSON SCANDAL

My friend Maître Olivier writes from Paris:

“My André, you are one scary judge of character. When I read in ‘The Larsson Scandal’ that you predict Eva Gabrielsson wants to make a Church of the Stiegysteria I think may be it is one of your little jokes, very sophisticate. You should know, who knows us so well, in France we shudder at Church of Scientology, founded by scifi writer Elron [L. Ron] Hubbard. Now Geni gives me proof copy of Gabrielsson biography ‘Millénium, Stieg & moi’. I don’t know what name in English.

“Do you still say ‘Holy shit!’ Or are you now respectable? I am most respectable but I say, ‘Holy shit!^10’ She holds Old Norse ceremony with live sacrifice of goat and prays to it for revenge on book editors, scénariste and directeur of film. She wants to sacrifice her father-in-law and brother-in-law for ‘selling out’ Stieg Larsson, slice their throats.

“All this for some bad onanismic [masturbatory] fantasy in cheap airport noirs [thrillers]. The woman is parfaitement [perfectly] insane. Dead Stieg comes to her as big black bird with a message from the God of Vengeance. For this in Sweden they would lock up Salander, the character yes? But Gabrielsson leads charmed life, no parking tickets.

“Gabrielsson wants to write fourth, nth new Stieg Larsson books. Maybe they should let her, hire you to make horror show in her head readable. RESIST TEMPTATION AS PSYCHIATRIST TO HEAL HER. Her sickness is worth millions!

“You’re psychic scary, mon ami [my friend]. I shiver as I embrace you. Heh-heh.

The novelist Patricia Sierra also sent me a heads-up in the form of a review of Gabrielsson’s book in Slate Magazine by Sasha Watson, who works off the French edition that Jean-Pierre found so revelatory. Here is Watson on the same bloodcurdling passages that kept Jean-Pierre up nights:

“By its end, the book is a vengeful battle cry. In one particularly incredible scene, Gabrielsson exorcises her grief and fury by performing a pagan ritual, complete with a torch and a goat’s head on a spike, in which she recites a poem to the Norse gods, cursing all those who crossed Larsson in life and in death. In another, she speaks to a crow she believes has been sent to her by the god Odin and which she thinks may be an embodiment of Larsson himself. She wraps up the book by swearing not only to continue her fight for the legal right to make decisions pertaining to the ways Larsson’s works and name are used and distributed, but to take revenge upon those who have wronged Larsson and herself. The phrase “a woman scorned” came to mind again and again as I read: Gabrielsson’s rage is Dido-like in both its determination and its mythological breadth. Whether this is the mild eccentricity of a grieving woman with a thing for Nordic myths or a sign that she’s going around the bend remains to be seen.”
— Sasha Watson in Slate

And here is the prediction, published almost three months before Gabrielsson’s book appeared, that she would try to establish a Church of St Stieg:

“There is a more than slightly farcical edge to Gabrielsson’s war on Larsson’s father and brother, and on agents and publishers changing money in her Stieg’s temple, ‘whoring’ him out. One has to wonder whether Gabrielsson’s insistence on turning a writer of conspiracy tomes into a saint of feminism is an attempt to start a Church of St Stieg, which will one day surely be bigger than L. Ron Hubbard’s Church of Scientology. For those too young to remember, Hubbard in his day was — wait for it — a popular science fiction and fantasy writer; his sci-fi is now the bible of his Church, which has a goodly number of celebrity celebrants and owns billions in real estate worldwide.
— André Jute and Andrew McCoy
— THE LARSSON SCANDAL the unauthorized guerilla critique of Stieg Larsson

In English Eva Gabrielsson’s book will be called “There Are Things I Want You to Know” about Stieg Larsson and Me. Seven Stories Press will publish this mouthful on 21 June 2011. It is devoutly to be hoped that Seven Stories puts better editors on the job than worked on the Millennium Trilogy, but from the evidence of those errant quotation marks in the very title of the book, the likelihood seems small.

This soap opera will run and run! And it is miles more amusing than the Millennium Trilogy.

More “psychic scary” predictions from the “scary judge of character” in THE LARSSON SCANDAL the unauthorized guerilla critique of Stieg Larsson (extra sample chapter) or buy at Amazon USA or UK

Reviewers and bloggers can still get a review copy of THE LARSSON SCANDAL by sending mail to info at coolmainpress with the commercial extension.