REVERSE NEGATIVE classic espionage thriller “So bizarre, it’s probably all true.”

“The author is very close to the truth.
The book has sufficient fact to make some people sit up.”
Richard Deacon, author of A History of the British Secret Service.

Reverse Negative by Andre Jute

REVERSE NEGATIVE
the classic espionage thriller
by André Jute
“So bizarre, it’s probably all true.”
London Evening News
Get a sample or buy from
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Kim Philby, the spy who betrayed a generation, has plotted his own death in a fiery helicopter accident. Immediately British Intelligence, the KGB, the CIA and Israeli Intelligence start searching for Philby’s “insurance” — a set of documents which point fatally accusing fingers at powerful men in high political, security and academic circles.

In England, a Cambridge don suddenly finds himself inextricably tangled in this web of violence. The rival intelligence services want him dead to prevent him talking, alive for questioning with drugs that will kill him anyway, or available for trading with those who want to kill or question him. To survive he must enlist the help of the sole survivor of the Israeli Intelligence team. And to uncover the devastating truth, he must got to the Lubianka, headquarters of the KGB in Moscow…

REVERSE NEGATIVE is a stunning and convincing story of the “Fourth Man” and of the disgraced darling of the Establishment, Kim Philby, whose treachery to the Western World lives on.

— Jacket copy by Nick Austin from an original edition
*

“Wild but exciting. A grand job with plenty of irony.”
New York Times

“So bizarre, it’s probably all true.”
London Evening News

“This is an important book.”
Sydney Morning Herald

“Keeps up such a pace and such interest that it really satisfies.”
Good Housekeeping

“A masterly story that has pace, humor, tension and excitement with the bonus of truth.”
The Australian

“Jute has clearly conducted a great deal of research into everything he describes, investing the novel with an air of prophecy. His moral and ecological concerns are important.”
Times Literary Supplement

Bonecruncher: Matt Posner’s pro wrestling novel SQUARED CIRCLE BLUES

Squared Circle BluesSQUARED CIRCLE BLUES:
A Novel of Professional Wrestling

by MATT POSNER

Reviewed by Andrew McCoy

SQUARED CIRCLE BLUES is exactly what it says on the tin, a novel of pro wrestling. Author Matt Posner pulls no punches, paints no glosses, makes no excuses for the milieu, the characters, or their actions. Pro wrestling turns out exactly as expected, only more violent, more dangerous, more crooked and more ruinous of the lives of innocent bystanders.

SQUARED CIRCLE BLUES rings true because it is true to the spirit and the detail of pro wrestling, which isn’t a sport but a business which consumes its children.

The organizers of pro wrestling are, of course, unsympathetic characters. But the surprising thing is how many of the wrestlers, and their families, are simpatico. It helps enormously to build our identification with the good characaters that Mr Posner gives us their viewpoint largely in dialogue, in their own words. He has a fine ear for the vernacular, and it turns these fantastic characters from the bizarre end of the spectrum of human experience into people like our
neighbours, at least if our neighbours were colourful.

By adding a large appendix of sources in which his facts can be checked, Mr Posner reinforces the impression that SQUARED CIRCLE BLUES, if it weren’t such good storytelling, could be a documentary, straightforward journalism told mainly in dialogue.

lanceseriesgraphicFor me, the main takeaway from this surprising, fascinating novel is how smoothly Mr Posner has managed to undermine our prejudicial certainties about people outside our own circle of trust and knowledge.
Andrew McCoy is the author of the Lance Weber series of adventure novels and literary criticism like STIEG LARSSON Man, Myth & Mistress.

Brand #NEW Lance #Weber #adventure from Andrew #McCoy

SMALL WAR, FAR AWAY
by Andrew McCoy

Lance Webber is on trial for his life for the adventures recounted in BLOOD IVORY. Even if he escapes the hangman’s rope, he can’t stay in Africa. But his friend Tanner is already established in South America, so Lance goes ranching. However, Hernandez, the military governor of the State, wants Lance and Tanner’s land, and the Falklands War gives him the pretext to turn Lance and his party, including guests like Jimmy and Boo, into wanted criminals on the run. This explosive scenario is complicated by Jimmy’s girlfriend, the daughter of the French politician who has yes-power over delivery of the Exocets without which Argentina knows she will lose the Falklands war. Hernandez must take Jeanine alive or his military superiors will stand him up in front of a firing squad.

SMALL WAR, FAR AWAY (Lance Weber 4) by Andrew McCoy

To save his wife and child, and his friends and their women, Lance must run and fight like he has never run and fought before, several thousand miles down the spine of Argentina to the only safety a stone’s throw from the Antartic at Punta Arenas on Cape Horn. But first, his back to a bridge he has blown up himself, in front of him a single road guarded by several hundred vengeful Argentinian soldiers, he must break out of the forest on the slopes of the Andes in which he has hidden the party.

SMALL WAR, FAR AWAY is another triumphant proof that no one excels Andrew McCoy in describing men and women in violent motion with their honor and lives as the prizes of failure. It is a tour de force by a writer at the peak of his form.

If you haven’t yet read the Andrew McCoy’s landmark Lance Weber Series, read the reviews below, then check it out.

Andrew McCoy’s books are available from iTunes Smashwords Kobo B&N and all other good vendors. Kindle versions from Smashwords.

Lance Weber Adventures by Andrew McCoy

What the critics said

“Mr McCoy gets on with the job of telling us exactly what it is like in the Heart of Darkness. He has the soldier’s eye for terrain and the soldier’s eye for character. This has the ring of truth.”
John Braine/Sunday Telegraph

“Very rough, exciting, filmic, and redolent of a nostalgie de boue d’Afrique. Full of the rapport and affection for blacks experienced only by the genuine old Africa hand.”
Alastair Phillips/Glasgow Herald

“Like the unblinking eye of a cobra, it is fascinating and hard to look away from, powerful and unique.”
Edwin Corley/Good Books

“I found this work excellent. I recommend it as a book to read on several planes, whether of politics, history or just as thriller — every episode is firmly etched on my memory. It is certainly a most impressive work of fiction.”
“H.P.”/BBC External Service

“Like a steam hammer on full bore.”
Jack Adrian/Literary Review

“Something else again. The author has plenty of first-hand experience of the conditions he describes so vividly.”
Marese Murphy/Irish Times

“Totally convincing fiction.”
Colonel Jonathan Alford, Director, Institute for Strategic Studies/BBC World at One

“The reader is in good hands.”
Kirkus Reviews

“Even in an entertaining thriller he makes us see ourselves anew.”
La Prensa

“Graphic adult Boys Own Adventure.”
The Irish Press

“Well written by somebody who has lived the life: a cracking read.”
Grant MacNeill/Amazon

Buggins’ Turn the Original Screenplay by Andre Jute, reviewed by Matt Posner: “farcical”

Matt Posner taking notes in Malmo, Sweden
Matt Posner taking notes in Malmo, Sweden

Buggins’ Turn is a farcical screenplay that reads like it has come out of the 1970s. I seriously could envision the forty-years-ago Dudley Moore (R.I.P.) or Peter Sellers (also R.I.P.) and Dyan Cannon in this one. Buggins is a mild-mannered, clueless nebbish who gets pushed around endlessly and has little control of his fate till the love of a woman begins to break through his timidity.

Buggins is up against a mega-corporation run by Lord and Lady Amazon. As one might expect with farce, Lord Amazon is way shorter than his wife, a riff that is coincidentally also found in some of the Shrek movies. I read the presence of a company called Amazon as an unsubtle play upon Jeff Bezos’ company.

buggins__turn_cover_800pxhBuggins’ allies are Celia (the woman I mentioned) a bumbling agent named Allan Allin (I may have botched the spelling) and Bloody Raztoz Razzamatazz, a nihilistic, dreadlocked Caribbean rap artist. Also featured are a hateful neighbor with an aggressive male dog named Lassie, a street urchin, the crackpot owners of a dictaphone store, and a number of villainous business types. Hell’s Angels make an extended appearance, with somewhat of the comic intensity of the motorcycle gang in Every Which Way You Can.

andre_jute_singapore
André Jute passing through Singapore. Photo: Roz Pain-Hayman.

I can definitely see this type of plot and action getting filmed in the 1970s; I saw many films of this type as a child. I think that Buggins’ Turn is however really more of a quick, amusing read than a viable script at this point, for which purpose I used it this morning while waiting in a room.

See more books by Andre Jute.

See Matt Posner’s books.

 

“I married my husband for his money. I have been very happy with my husband’s money.” — Dakota Franklin

dakotafranklin_800px

“I married my husband for his money. 
I have been very happy with my husband’s money.”
Dakota Franklin

You won’t believe how much trouble that innocent joke got me into. And it isn’t even true. The truth is much more romantic, but is too long for a quick joke. Still, you and I have a moment, so I’ll tell you the truth.

Read the rest of the great romance between Ferry and me.

Eat #chocolate with Cecilia #Bartoli. Win #FREE #bestselling #books for your e-reader

Cecilia Bartoli
The Andre Jute Interview
“Salieri never poisoned Mozart!” — Cecilia Bartoli
&
A chance to win some good holiday reading
at
Cookie’s Book Club
See you there!

May you reach as safe a harbour as this one

Andre Jute: Sampan Harbor, South China Sea, oil on canvas, 2014, 16x12in
Andre Jute: Sampan Harbor, South China Sea, oil on canvas, 2014, 16x12in

Happy holidays, all!

CAIN’S COURAGE Classic Adventure by Andrew McCoy for 99¢

Who else gives you reviews and thrills like these
in a proven bestseller for only 99¢?

What the critics said:

“Mr McCoy gets on with the job of telling us exactly what it is like in the Heart of Darkness. He has the soldier’s eye for terrain and the soldier’s eye for character. This has the ring of truth.”
John Braine/Sunday Telegraph

“Very rough, exciting, filmic, and redolent of a nostalgie de boue d’Afrique. Full of the rapport and affection for blacks experienced only by the genuine old Africa hand.”
Alastair Phillips/Glasgow Herald

“Like the unblinking eye of a cobra, it is fascinating and hard to look away from, powerful and unique.”
Edwin Corley/Good Books 

“I found this work excellent. I recommend it as a book to read on several planes, whether of politics, history or just as thriller — every episode is firmly etched on my memory. It is certainly a most impressive work of fiction.”
“H.P.”/BBC External Service 

“Like a steam hammer on full bore.”
Jack Adrian/Literary Review

“Something else again. The author has plenty of first-hand experience of the conditions he describes so vividly.”
Marese Murphy/Irish Times 

“Totally convincing fiction.”
Colonel Jonathan Alford, Director, Institute for Strategic Studies/BBC World at One 

“The reader is in good hands.”
Kirkus Reviews 

“Even in an entertaining thriller he makes us see ourselves anew.”
La Prensa 

“Graphic adult Boys Own Adventure.”
The Irish Press

“Well written by somebody who has lived the life: a cracking read.”
Grant MacNeill

More about this classic thriller at STOP THE TERRORISTS! DEAD.

Who else gives you reviews and thrills like these in a proven bestseller for only 99¢?
Get a sample/buy: iTunes Smashwords Kobo B&N

Huge Christmas #Giveaway at Cookie’s Book Club, #BestSellers, #PrizeWinners, #FREE ENTRY

cookie_s_book_club_christmas_giveaway_2014

Including my latest books, FESTIVAL and LASHBACK, and Dakota Franklin’s latest racing thriller, TRIPLE THREAT THRILL. Not to mention books by the excellent Donna Fasano, Libby Fischer Hellman, Uvi Poznanasky and Zeev Rachel, J. S. Dunn, and Melanie McDonald. Plus copies of my famous IDITAROD, a family-safe novel of the greatest race on earth. On top of that there are several copies of Omnibuses from Dakota and me to be won, high value books. All FREE. And the rules are loosely framed so you can enter every day from the 21st so you stand a really good chance of winning a book, or even several, enough high quality reading matter for the entire holiday. Good luck. Merry Christmas. Check it out at Cookie’s Book Club.  — Andre Jute

“I give this book five stars. It is highly recommended for everyone with a strong stomach for violence.” — Matt Posner

mccoy_blood_ivory_cover_800pxh

Contemporary review of
BLOOD IVORY by Andrew McCoy
by the novelist
Matt Posner
***** (5 stars out of 5)

This book was originally published in the 1970s; I read the new edition by Cool Main Press, which is both re-issuing Andrew McCoy’s work and commissioning new novels from him. This text was provided to me by the publisher at my request since I was interviewing the gentleman for my website.

Blood Ivory is a direct sequel to African Revenge, to which I also gave five stars. Both feature as hero Lance Weber, who is an apprentice adventurer in the first novel and a veteran adventurer here, travelling on the road in a caravan of trucks with a mixture of sub-Saharan Africans as employees and partners. Both are unflinching in their depiction of race relations and racial conflict. Blood Ivory adds some new elements: boats, helicopters, and Chinese participants in the conflicts.

lance_weber_series_cover_2500

The range of this story is expanded to include England and many places in Asia, including Singapore and Hong Kong. More parts of Africa are shown; I was surprised by the small scale, since the truck convoy seems to cross countries in fewer hours than it would take to cross states that I drive through in the United States. I know Andrew McCoy has it right, however. No thriller writer knows Africa better than Andrew McCoy.

The novel posits an alternate-reality version of the 1970s world in which wild elephants are near extinction, and with their extermination, the price of their ivory will be dramatically magnified. The result, as one might expect after reading African Revenge, is brutal slaughter of men as well as animals.

Blood Ivory is a very gripping novel with strong characterization and terrific plot. It confirms me in my belief that I will enjoy anything Andrew McCoy writes, even when I am horrified by the cruelty and gore and even when I find the characters’ attitudes alien to my own. This is a different type of thriller than those written in this century, because of its setting, because of the treatment of race (and violence toward women), because of the characters’ necessary reliance upon 1970s technology (no mobile phones or computers).

I give this book five stars. It is highly recommended for everyone with a strong stomach for violence.

I hope I will soon see a reissue of McCoy’s controversial novel Atrocity Week. Really longing for a look at that one.

Read more international reviews from leading papers around the world.

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“That time I was certified I was dead only for seconds” — Dakota Franklin’s TRIPLE THREAT THRILL

CoolMain Press Proudly Announces
Publication 
of the
Ninth
 Volume Appearing in
Dakota Franlin’s Grand Series
RUTHLESS TO WIN

“A wonderful story full of action and remarkable detail
Boyd S Drew

“The Queen of Racing Scribes”
John Houlton

TRIPLE THREAT THRILL by Dakota FranklinTRIPLE THREAT THRILL 

by Dakota Franklin

Get a sample & buy at
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On her thirty-third birthday she is broken in body from 15 years of racing on the ragged edge, and in spirit from bad luck and bad decisions in choosing her men. For her family she gave up Drew the ‘fortune hunter’, her beloved Hiroshi died headless in her arms, and Erich wanted only to use her to further his own ambition. Still, even if after a two-year absence from driving to be a ‘good wife’ to the treacherous pervert Erich she will never be grand prix champion, she is Jack Armitage’s all-time favorite driver, engineer and racing executive: ‘Triple Threat’ Thrill Morgan, the Parachute Queen Jack sends to salvage impossible situations in his auto racing empire.

Jack brings Thrill Morgan back from despair with Erich in Monte Carlo to be his successor as the head of Armitage when the younger generation takes over. First she will be Chairman of Armitage America which, in the usual excessive Armitage style, has vastly overextended its racing program. Jack sees the appointment as an opportunity for Thrill, who made almost her entire racing career in the Far East and Europe, to be a champion back home in the Indy Racing League—and perhaps in the Indy 500 itself. Jack also wants to confirm Thrill’s status as one of the most versatile racers of all time with a win in NASCAR stock cars, preferably at Daytona, and a win at Le Mans, where she has always driven support for the Armitage partner Charlie Cartwright.

Drew, now a successful publisher whom no one can accuse of being a fortune hunter, lives in San Francisco, just a short plane ride up the coast from Armitage America’s test track in the mountains back of Santa Barbara.

With work, her racing and her burgeoning relationship with Drew to keep her busy, Thrill is slowly rebuilding her shattered self-image. Briefly it seems as if the only question is: Will Thrill, born so fortunate, so talented, so celebrated, so loved by so many, once more end up in surgery — or worse:

‘That time I was certified I was dead only for seconds, then I was bitching Dieter, the trauma specialist, for carelessly dropping a bottle — which I caught as the other certifying physician drew the sheet over my face.’

–and all alone.

But Erich de Stahl will not give up his prize so easily. The son of an armaments tycoon, he commands the loyalty of whole platoons of Corsican thugs. If he cannot have Thrill, then no one else will either. If Erich cannot have the glittering racing career he wanted, he is determined that she will not have it either. A psychopath far more vicious than any on the most cutthroat track, Erich de Stahl will stop at nothing to revenge himself on the woman who, for a parting gesture, sank his family’s 190 foot, $100m superyacht across the mouth of the harbor at Monte Carlo so that the police would be forced to arrest him for child molestation.

‘You maliciously sink my ship, you blackmail me, you mutilate my employees—and now you harass my son,’ Baron de Stahl said. ‘This cannot go on.’

‘Your son sent your employees to murder Thrill,’ Charlie said. ‘They did murder one of her guests. Your sainted son also promised to give Thrill to those Corsican thugs to rape.’

The Baron shrugged in his greatcoat.

His indifference shocked me more than anything else in the whole affair so far except seeing Tom Tripp stupidly killed because a Corsican thug did not have his reflexes under control.

Thrill is of course insanely competitive. That is how she rocketed to the top in a profession, a sport and a business for men in which the survivors are not renowned for their sensitivity and delicacy.

‘Kiss my ass, Lasalle. Kiss my ass again. Then kiss my ass goodbye!’

Thrill doesn’t care how many Corsican thugs Erich sends: she will return them damaged. But Erich, maddened by rage at Thrill’s celebrity as she returns to racing and takes Armitage public, cannot stop escalating. All the signals are that Erich is plotting some violent action against Thrill.

The vastly experienced Harringtons protecting Thrill are desperately worried. They consider Thrill to be one of them, as violently proactive as they are. So they cannot understand why Thrill as the head of Armitage must be more circumspect.

I turned to stare into Commander Oliver’s eyes. ‘And you have the cheek to lecture me about being reckless? We’re sitting in the Grecian colonnade at Armitage America’s headquarters—calmly discussing cold-blooded murder.’

‘Erich already set you up once for cold-blooded murder,’ Charlie said. ‘He’s doing it again. How many chances do you want us to give him?

But Erich, a master-manipulator, has faked them out, misdirected their attention to strike where Thrill least expects the blow, where it will destroy her forever as a woman and a human being if this time she does not win.

Triple Threat Thrill is loaded with engrossing sidelights on the rock’n’roll hysteria of celebrity, superb racing in the States, Europe and the Far East, a sensual love story and brilliant illuminations of a top racing team wielding the power of its wealth and fame.

 Get a sample & buy at
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(Kindle at Smashwords)

“Lovers and enemies alike have their price.” — FESTIVAL by Andre Jute

CoolMain Press Proudly Announces
publication of
FESTIVAL
the classic thriller of the performing arts
by André Jute

festival_cover-25x8-800pxh

“Lovers and enemies alike have their price.”

Special introductory price of $2.99.
Get a sample or buy from
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When the formidable Iron Curtain conductor Vlaklos decides to defect to the West at the Adelaide Festival of Arts, consequent events electrify an elite group related through their loves, their hatreds, their secrets and their ambitions. Lovers and enemies alike have their price.

The rising impresario Ransome is torn between his fear for the life of the great conductor and his duty to his friend O’Neal, whose re-election as Premier depends on the smooth running of the Festival. A complication is Ransome’s long friendship with Kerensky, the KGB’s cultural watchdog over Vlaklos: if the conductor defects, Kerensky will be shot. Ransome also has to cope with the shifting political pressures applied to him from every side. All this while trying to run the largest arts festival in the world, with nobody to turn to except Mellie, his fiancée. And even she, with the benefit of having “the great plots of the world explained to me over breakfast” by her communications-tycoon father, cannot detect all the currents before the last night of the Festival, when they converge explosively.

The New York Times hailed André Jute’s literary début, Reverse Negative, as “wild but exciting” and the London Evening News thought it “so bizarre, it’s probably all true”. In FESTIVAL he brings together his intimate experience of the high-powered performing arts world, his inside knowledge of the security apparats of the world and his abiding love of Adelaide with the terse narrative, pointed dialogue and sharp-focus characterization that elicited such high praise around the world for his writing.

The resulting novel lifts the lid off the world’s premier arts festival to show the deals that sustain it, the careers it makes and breaks, the men and women of the city itself and from all over the world whose lives are changed by it. FESTIVAL displays all the suspense mounting to a shattering crescendo — and the astounding twist-in-the-tail — that is the hallmark of this highly original writer of elegant, credible and truly memorable fiction.

“Stupid books and stupid rumors about sketching and painting!” — Marialena Sarris

mls800pxh_grapes-marialena-sarris

Marialena Sarris: Grapes, watercolour, 35x50cm.
You can see more of Marialena’s art here

mlscr14-148x150Marialena Sarris is a Greek painter made very angry by the “stupidity” of Betty Edwards’ Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain

Every day I see another victim of this stupid book Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain by Betty Edwards. This book is the ultimate art alibi. I made the mistake of reading it and became angry with what I read.

Edwards’ book tries to persuade people that they are not able to sketch because they don’t use the right side of their brain and dedicates loads of pages to providing the supposed scientific proof.

We don’t draw with the right side of our brains, we draw with our whole brain, and a well developed right brain hemisphere is the one that makes the difference between a very good painter and the average sketcher.

BUT anyone who can write can sketch. That is a rule. If schools spent the same amount of time, that they spend on teaching writing, to teach sketching, all people would be decent sketchers in the same way all schooled people know how to draw letters on their paper. Asian people literally draw letters on their paper with a brush, so that even the worst of Chinese pupils, knowing how to write Chinese letters, already know how to draw.

Practice and method is the answer.

But so many are misinformed by Drawing on the Right Side of Brain. It is not their fault but the misinformation becomes a handy alibi for not putting in the time and the practice.

Stupid books and stupid rumors about sketching and painting!

Copyright ©2014 text and images Marialena Sarris.

“…a good job of presenting the Revolution itself as a another character…” — J. A. Beard

Coolmain Press
proudly announces publication of
cwhp_cover_4_brothers_enemies_800pxhBROTHERS & ENEMIES
Book 4 of the 75-Year Saga
by André Jute
containing
BROTHERS & ENEMIES
PRIVATE INTIMATIONS
TROPIC OF TREASON

…recalls Russian literature at its finest. VANGUARD ELITE was a real pleasure to read, the writing is rock solid and flawless – every word is the right word, in the right place. The next volume is written and awaiting publication. Bring it on.

abrwrite/LibraryThing

The exploration of the mindset of the Revolution is fascinating.The complex nature and motivations of the revolutionaries and the sorry state of Russia at the time are explored in a way that makes the suffering palpable in an engaging way without pretending that the people who want to be in charge are necessarily as noble or capable as some of them would like to believe. The author does a good job of presenting the Revolution itself as a another character, and through its atmosphere and details begins to offer a commentary and explanation for what history will further bring.
J. A. Beard/Good Book Alert

It reads like a literary classic and as a screenplay for a historical documentary miniseries. The language is lush, vibrant even when describing the horrors associated with the Bolshevik Revolution. The imagery through words painted by author Andre Jute makes me feel that I am moving through an art gallery where I wish to study every aspect, explore every color, more than once. I cannot remember when I have read a book of this caliber in recent years.
Doug Glassford/Amazon

“I am reading this now. So well-written, with the combination of graceful, elegant prose and tough subject matter that makes Andre one of the best around.”
Matt Posner on Facebook

BROTHERS & ENEMIES
Stalin was paranoid. He had good reason to be. He planned a new Terror. Somebody plotted to kill him before he could start the new cycle of arrests and executions. But it wasn’t the Jewish doctors Stalin killed for it. The plotters were people Stalin overlooked as
totally loyal, true patriots.
PRIVATE INTIMATIONS
In immediately postwar Italy, among the reprisals and communist wrecking, Joshua Adams and Hillel Hirsch play off the Mafia and the Camorra on the international black market to raise the funds to buy an entire nation, plus the loyalty of the yet-to-be Israeli they aid and abet against the British, who want only to send Jewish refugee ships bound for Tel Aviv to the bottom of the Mediterranean. In Ankara, meanwhile, their friend Kim Philby is hours from being exposed.
TROPIC OF TREASON
William Harvey McQueen is the FBI’s point man against Stalin’s killer goons and atomic spies. Years before he would beintroduced to President Kennedy as “the American James Bond”, he exposes spies with offices in the White House itself. Tropic of Treason tells how— and above all why — David Adams recruits Harvey McQueen to the CIA, where he exposes Burgess, McLean and Philby as Russian spies.

All in one volume at only
$2.99/£1.88/€2.60
Get a sample/buy: iTunes Smashwords Kobo B&N

BROTHERS & ENEMIES
is
Book 4 of Cold War, Hot Passions

cwhp_series_800pxhCold War, Hot Passions
by André Jute
The epic saga
of ten intertwined families
who live and die by their love of
their Russian and American motherlands
and the searing passions they
arouse in each other

FROM THE STORMING OF THE WINTER PALACE…
In the beginning they were impassioned young revolutionaries risking only own their lives for justice. The prince, the soldier, the peasant and the baroness became the founders of three families, steadfast in love and war, whose generations are enfolded in the sweep of humans and inhumans, inquisitors and victims, the betrayals of friends and family, the show trials of colleagues, the psychiatric tortures of dissidents, that was Russia under the Communists, right up to glasnost, when the fourth generation must answer the question, Was the result worth three generations of tragic suffering and sacrifice?

And the Americans who opposed them for liberty, the patrician Adams family, the refugee Hirches, the redneck Remptons who became political powers in the land, the McQueens who did not count the price of rising from smalltown mid-America to the highest levels of the nation, the Drexlers who had always served their country, the implacable Southern Hubbells who could — and did — threaten Presidents, and the clever Talbots whose shy Joanne married the handsome Russian who was the cleverest traitor of them all.

In his first novel for two decades, a storyteller who has always had a knack with the true history of men and women will touch your heart and thrill your mind with the risks these men and women took with their lives and their families for the ideals they were born to — which some betrayed, and some paid too high a price for in love, even with their lives.

…TO THE BITTERSWEET END
75 YEAR LATER
COLD WAR, HOT PASSIONS
• around 2000 pages
• launched in eight volumes 

“….exactly what it is like in the Heart of Darkness” — John Braine/Sunday Telegraph

CoolMain Press Proudly Announces
Back by Popular Demand
BLOOD IVORY
Second in Andrew McCoy’s
LANCE WEBER SERIES
About the Quintessential Hard Man of Africa

mccoy_blood_ivory_cover_800pxh
BLOOD IVORY
by Andrew McCoy

The equation is simple: on the day the last elephant in the world is shot, ivory will be more valuable than gold. Two men — one a merchant prince, the other a big-game hunter — are preparing for that day by acculumating vast hoards of the irreplaceable tusk. It is the hunter who makes the first mistake, and pays the price.

His widow engages Lance Weber on the lethal brief of reclaiming her inheritance from the very heart of war-torn Africa. Lance is on the run from the ghost of Bruun, a man believed by every authority to be dead, who is still killing Lance’s employees, friends, parents, drawing concentric circles of terror ever tighter around Lance himself. Lance wants no ivory but he is driven by the need to avenge the many innocent dead and to expunge the evil of Bruun from the face of the earth. Bruun has shown that he too lusts for the ivory, so Lance sets himself, the ivory — and the beautiful widow — as bait for the mad predator. Their violent duel carves a scar across the face of the globe, from Sydney to Kent to Macao, from the harsh red grit of Africa to the suppurating green lushness of the Opium Triangle.

— dust-jacket blurb by John Blackwell, from the original hardcover edition

It did not occur to Mpengi that men would die in Macao, the China Seas, Brussels, Tokyo, the Burmese jungles, Africa and the Kent countryside because the bellies of his children were empty. He did not know of these places.

What Mpengi did that would have such disastrous effects around the world, what he did to relieve the gnawing mouse in the bellies of his children, was simplicity itself. He wenr to the camp of the Englishman with the red face and the luxuriant white moustache and told him where to find the last six elephants in the world.

— from BLOOD IVORY by Andrew McCoy

What the critics said:

“Mr McCoy gets on with the job of telling us exactly what it is like in the Heart of Darkness. He has the soldier’s eye for terrain and the soldier’s eye for character. This has the ring of truth.”
John Braine/Sunday Telegraph

“Very rough, exciting, filmic, and redolent of a nostalgie de boue d’Afrique. Full of the rapport and affection for blacks experienced only by the genuine old Africa hand.”
Alastair Phillips/Glasgow Herald

“Like the unblinking eye of a cobra, it is fascinating and hard to look away from, powerful and unique.”
Edwin Corley/Good Books

“I found this work excellent. I recommend it as a book to read on several planes, whether of politics, history or just as thriller — every episode is firmly etched on my memory. It is certainly a most impressive work of fiction.”
“H.P.”/BBC External Service

“Like a steam hammer on full bore.”
Jack Adrian/Literary Review

“Something else again. The author has plenty of first-hand experience of the conditions he describes so vividly.”
Marese Murphy/Irish Times

“Totally convincing fiction.”
Colonel Jonathan Alford, Director, Institute for Strategic Studies/BBC World at One

“The reader is in good hands.”
Kirkus Reviews

“Even in an entertaining thriller he makes us see ourselves anew.”
La Prensa

“Graphic adult Boys Own Adventure.”
The Irish Press

“Well written by somebody who has lived the life: a cracking read.”
Grant MacNeill/Amazon

Buy it or get a sample at:
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1911 was a very good year for writers: best Brittanica ever, birth of the Colt Model 1911, “the most referenced firearm in 20th Century literature”

1911 was a very good year for writers:
best Brittanica ever,
birth of the Colt Model 1911,
“the most referenced firearm in 20th Century literature”

R. Doug Wicker, who always stands ready to advise other writers on firearms, and see also, has several articles up and coming soon on the most common US pistol, and one of it’s putative “replacements”. Doug says:

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“In a run-up to next week’s shooting review of the Colt M1991A1, yesterday I posted Historical Firearms — The Colt Model 1911.  If you’re a purveyor of fiction that involves firearms then you may want to take a look at this brief history.  The M1911 is probably the most referenced firearm in 20th Century literature, and is ubiquitous in almost any movie or television show in which handguns play a major role in the storyline including pretty much anything dealing with the U.S. military.”

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“And next I’ll present a post on what it’s like to actually operate and fire one of these classic pistols.

 

Buggins’ Turn reviewed: “quirky, humorous and downright terrifying-to-the-funny-bone”

buggins__turn_cover_800pxhBuggins’ Turn reviewed: “quirky, humorous and downright terrifying-to-the-funny-bone” — see the full review

$2.99 and equivalents at all good bookstores.
All formats including Kindle to sample & buy at Smashwords
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A spectacular performance of La Boheme on Lake Massaciuccoli

puccini_s_lake_800pxhThe hard life of an editor just doesn’t let up.
Lisa Penington is a stalwart of the Editorial Menagerie, where she edits books byDakota Franklin, Andrew McCoy and Andre Jute for CoolMain Press.
Every year in July and August Lisa takes a break at her house near Nice, with side trips to the open-air opera in Tuscany.

lisa_waiting_out_rain_at_outdoors_opera_800pxhPUCCINI FESTIVAL
TORRE DEL LAGO, TUSCANY, AUGUST 2014
by Lisa Penington

We missed out on a visit to the Puccini Festival last year but my daughter and I made it again this year. Torre del Lago was buzzing as usual at this time of year and our first visit was to Turandot, an opera I have seen eight or nine times but which never ceases to enchant. The production was spectacular, beautifully dressed and well sung. Surprisingly for August in Tuscany the night was chilly and a great commerce was done by blanket sellers! We had not expected rain on the Thursday but literally five minutes before the end the conductor signified that the orchestra should stop and we all rushed for cover in the foyer of the arena as the deluge started.

At least that was better than my Verona experience some years ago when it rained for an hour in the first interval, then after the second break we waited in vaIn for the forecasters to announce an end to the bad weather. We left without seeing the last act, the one everyone is waiting for with the wonderful aria Nessun Dorma.

toasting_clear_weather_800pxhWe had expected bad weather on Friday but to our surprise we were warm and comfortable during La Boheme with no sign of the expected rain despite the threatening clouds you can see in our shot of Lake Massaciuccoli taken as we walked to the arena. This was a new production by the veteran film director Ettore Scola and it was very beautiful. The Cafe Momus scene was outstanding with a great atmosphere as the set had a second floor where you could see waiters serving customers while the action was proceeding in the street outside. Both Mimi and Rudolfo were excellent, experienced singers from the famous opera houses of the world. Daniela Dessí is apparently the first singer to perform an encore of ‘Vissi d’arte’ at the Teatro Comunale in Florence since Tebaldi in the ’50s. It was nice to be able to stay to give them the applause that was missing due to the rain the night before.

This time we stayed on a great little B&B right next to Puccini’s villa/museum so there was no rush for the cars after the performance.

A perfect stay!

More from Lisa:
The hard life of an editor
Three days in Tuscany

Text and photographs © Copyright Lisa Penington 2014

IDITAROD by Andre Jute, reviewed by LeAnn Neal Reilly

IDITAROD a novel of The Greatest Race on Earth by Andre Jute

IDITAROD a novel of The Greatest Race on Earth by Andre Jute
Reviewed by LeAnn Neal Reilly

I very much enjoyed this tale of adventure, romance, and danger on the Iditarod Trail. Set in 1985, the heart of the story is an impetuous bet between one Rhodes Delaney, a sled-dog racer from Colorado, and James Whitbury, an Olympic gold-medal skier who also happens to be an MIT-trained engineer and inventor with a trust fund. (Yes, James is a bit too-good-to-be-true, but I’m happy to let that slide. After all, I actually know a few young men who could satisfy at least some of these traits. Mostly it’s the trust fund part that doesn’t convince me.)

Jute carefully establishes the main characters, including a monstrous wolf pack, before the actual Iditarod race begins, deftly weaving in details with a light hand. Initially misunderstandings and unfamiliarity color the nascent relationship between Rhodes and James (they met by chance at the outset), who train for the race of a lifetime in very different ways. Rhodes, the daughter of a Colorado rancher, will eschew corporate sponsorship to keep her father’s hand-carved wooden sled unspoiled with advertising; instead, she’ll work 12-hour days in a salmon-processing factory to raise the $20,000 to compete. But at least she’s bred and trained her own dogs and has half a lifetime’s experience racing. James, on the other hand, can afford to train and race, but he accepts sponsorship from Frontier Construction, getting dogs, training, and other elite help in return for designing and testing a lightweight alloy sled. He spends the better part of his training-year prototyping and testing a sled for production, but that’s okay. He’s got an experienced dog breeder and coach, along with the best nutritionist and gear that money can buy.

Once the race begins, so too does the story. Jute skillfully paces the writing to match the events. Though it moves quickly, the story never gets ahead of itself. At first, the story is told from Rhodes’s point of view, but at a critical, terrifying moment, it switches to James’s and then to a third-person view of the wolf pack, a distant but clearly festering problem. As the two racers face growing dangers and challenges on the 1200-mile trail from Anchorage to Nome, the wolves circle just outside their awareness but never far outside the reader’s. The viewpoints continue to alternate until settling down with Rhodes’. Jute ups the ante as the race draws to a close, heaping exhaustion and terrifying danger upon his two main characters. The final harrying sequence of events, while not nail-biting, does require sitting up straight, scooting to the edge of the seat, and paying attention very closely.

I particularly enjoyed the story because of its realistic, and thorough, description of the Iditarod race, its history, the trail, and what it takes to compete. For a brief (and irrational moment), I wistfully wished I could experience the thrill of riding on the runners behind a sled pulled by a dozen well-trained dogs. However, I’m not so keen on facing angry moose, bear, or wolves, nor do I wish to ride into the teeth of 40-mile-an-hour wind. And I’d prefer to sleep more than a few hours at a time, especially on a soft, warm bed.

I must also say that I found the romance between Rhodes and James both charming and a bit quaint (though I don’t mean anything pejorative by this). James has a gentleman’s manners from another era: he politely requests permission to be excused by an elderly woman at the beginning, and he gallantly charges into a blizzard to help Rhodes, then camps chastely with her.

It isn’t simply the romance that calls to mind a different, more genteel, era. There is a clear sense of propriety and duty throughout, a stiff-upper-lip sort of stoicism in the face of grievous difficulty, the understanding that the race takes precedence over everything else for Rhodes and James because they have said that they will run it, and their honor and sense of self are bound up in completing it to the best of their abilities. I personally am attracted to such characters.

IDITAROD a novel of The Greatest Race on Earth by Andre Jute
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On Winsor & Newton’s Bijou Paintbox, my Little Postcard Pocketable Pochade Tin, and bicycling in the bitter Irish Spring

Last year for my birthday one of the gifts I received was the last Winsor & Newton Bijou Box from Green & Stone in London. I never actually received the brush supposed to go with this box but would in any event have chucked it out to fit in four more half pans, new total twelve, because the standard eight is one short of my minimum palette and a more normal palette for me is twelve colors. I have one of those WN travel brushes that came with another WN kit, and it is uselessly small, except I suppose to people who want to paint the eyes on gnats. The Bijou Box, about the size of a visiting card, now lives in my Little Watercolor Pochade Tin, a pocketable traveling watercolor kit kept on the hall table by my glove chest to grab whenever I go out. Today I went out on my bike, and the first thing I saw that I wanted to sketch was a well kept hedge, the pride and joy of some farmer’s wife.

andre_jute__painting_the_hedge 800pxhMy favorite bike, a Utopia Kranich, and my Little Watercolour Pochade Tin, caught in action on the ten minutes in which it was pleasant to stand painting outside on a miserably cold spring day in Ireland.

andre_jute_painting_the_hedge_w_n_bijou_box_800pxhAndre Jute: The Hedge, 230g rough paper, 6x4in.

The photo shows that the Bijou Box is Winsor & Newton’s most compact paintbox, about the size of a visiting card. The box itself isn’t well made or finished, and will soon rust, starting at the bubbles and pinholes in the so-called “enamel”; with eight half pans of color it is grossly overpriced at 55 Euro, say about eighty US dollars. I’m not surprised that WN have stopped selling it if Fome cannot supply a better quality box.