Requiem at Monza by Dakota Franklin — the A team in action

Current version:

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REQUIEM AT MONZA by Dakota Franklin

‘There is something about me you should know, Ludo. I try hard for what you might call sophistication, but underneath the veneer I’m a barbarian. My violent instincts have been nurtured, trained, honed to perfection by my family, my community, my government and my peers, for instant, mindless application.’

Jack Armitage has been accused of murder, a charge that could bring down his auto racing empire. Joanne is the help hired from Harrington’s to extricate him from the mess.

Tall, beautiful and lethal, to keep her Armitage companions alive, Joanne has to steer a deceitful, violent course through Italian legal and judicial corruption, the Mafia, crooked police, and a growing body count.

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– 3-par concept by “George Hamilton”, text by TresaC, adapted by me. You still got two days to beat out the A-team by improving on this without adding any words.

The A-team of blurb writers hangs out at Kuforum.
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[Original version]
[DRAFT JACKET COPY OFFERED FOR FURTHER CUTTING]

Requiem at Monza by Dakota Franklin

“I’m Joanne Bartlett. I was educated in Tennessee and Washington. I took my twin Ph.D.s in instant action from the Ivy League of controlled violence, Quantico and the Secret Service of the Treasury. My finishing school was a high-speed dash across France in a Bentley Arnage Red Label.”

Joanne is a 6 foot 4 inch legend in her profession for taking a bullet for the President. But she wakes up angry every morning because at 28 she is too tall, too beautiful, and too dangerous, simply too much to get a man.

Now Joanne, making her mark in private industry, is seconded from security consultants Harrington’s to help the auto racing house Armitage sort out a vicious judicial muddle in Italy. Jack Armitage himself is charged with the murder of Silvio Ferrara, who died in an accident in the Italian Grand Prix at Monza. It will destroy the firm.

Mired in a mass of impenetrable Italian immorality, fearful that she and her Armitage helpers will be killed by the Camorra (the northern Italian Mafia), whose role in the interlinked crimes is obscure, Joanne meets deceit with deceit and violence with a bigger body count.

“There is something about me you should know, Ludo. I try hard for what you might call sophistication, but underneath the veneer I’m a barbarian. My violent instincts have been nurtured, trained, honed to perfection by my family, my community, my government and my peers, for instant, mindless application.”

REQUIEM AT MONZA is the second novel to be launched in Dakota Franklin’s grand series RUTHLESS TO WIN. The first volume, LE MANS a novel has already appeared on bestseller lists in four countries.

2 Comments

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2 Responses to Requiem at Monza by Dakota Franklin — the A team in action

  1. Danneaux

    Andre, how ’bout this:
    “I’m Joanne Bartlett. I took my twin Ph.D.s in instant action from the Ivy League of controlled violence, Quantico and the Secret Service of the Treasury. My finishing school was a high-speed dash across France in a Bentley Arnage Red Label.”

    A legend in her profession for taking a bullet for the President, Joanne is now making her mark in private industry to help the auto racing house Armitage sort out a vicious judicial muddle in Italy. Jack Armitage himself is charged with the murder of Silvio Ferrara, who died in an accident in the Italian Grand Prix at Monza. It will destroy the firm.

    Mired in Italian immorality, fearful Armitage and her helpers will be killed by the Camorra Mafia, Joanne meets deceit with deceit and violence with a bigger body count.

    “There is something about me you should know, Ludo. I try hard for what you might call sophistication, but underneath the veneer I’m a barbarian. My violent instincts have been nurtured, trained, honed to perfection by my family, my community, my government and my peers, for instant, mindless application.”

    All the best,

    Danneaux.

  2. Nice sidestep, Dan. Learn it in dancing class?

    I’m afraid that everyone who’s read the book, only a handful of editors, agrees that Joanne’s character was formed by rejection. She is a very specific, carefully formed character, with a huge sense of her own worth, whose pride is, literally, lethal.

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